10 Books About Books & Book Lovers

For the last couple of months the book blogging world has been enthralled by The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern. I’m only 1/3 in so I can’t say much about it yet, but one of the reasons why everyone seems to love it (and rightly so!) is that it pays homage to reading, readers and the books we all love.

If you have already read The Starless Sea and are wondering what to do with yourself, or would simply like to read more books on this theme, here are 10 books to keep you going:

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3 Books I Want To Re-read Soon-ish

I recently re-read One Hundred Years Of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez. The previous and only other time I read it was in July 2014; I know this because I reviewed it in one of my very first blog posts. (The review is actually surprisingly good: it uses smart words like ‘corporate hegemony’ and only has one spelling mistake.)

One of the main things I discovered while re-reading the book was how little of the story I actually remembered. Most of my memories were linked to the feeling of the book, the epic writing style, the elements of magical realism etc. I had forgotten most of the characters and events.

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Book | The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The book thief feat

Here is a small fact: You are going to die.

1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier. Liesel, a nine-year-old girl, is living with a foster family on Himmel Street. Her parents have been taken away to a concentration camp. Liesel steals books. This is her story and the story of the inhabitants of her street when the bombs begin to fall.

Reading this book I passed away many long motorway hours while I was on a roadtrip with my boyfriend. It had me sit in the car with tears streaming down my face, refusing to take my eyes off the page. When said boyfriend asked me what was wrong, I cried “this book is so goo-hood”. This was not entirely true. Though the end of the novel made me feel very strongly for the characters, it took a long while to get me there. Though the beginning of the story is intriguing – it starts with a death and the theft of a gravediggers’ handbook – everything slows down when Liesel arrives on Himmel Street. It changes from an adult novel into a children’s story about a girl who suffers from nightmares and gets up to all sorts of mischief with her new friends, set against a backdrop of the beginning of the Second World War in Germany. The novel doesn’t pick up its initial, more interesting style untill the war is in full swing. Continue reading “Book | The Book Thief by Markus Zusak”